Finding Joe the Quilter’s Cottage: Success!

We’ve been posting a reasonable amount about Joe the Quilter recently, and I won’t go over his story, our initial investigation last year, or the plans we have to replicate it (Clara also posted some pictures of initial progress of the excavation a few weeks ago), but we have managed to find Joe’s cottage!

Not only find it, but excavate it to the base of the walls and the sub-floor level, as well as dig the gardens at either end of the building. The image below shows three of the walls and some of the flagstone floor. The field-boundary cuts across the cottage at about two-thirds of it’s width – the front wall would have been right next to the road.

Excavated Joe's Cottage foundations

Most of the flagstones and walling stone had been robbed away, but enough remained for us to be able to work out the size of the building and something of the construction and destruction sequences. It turns out that the plan from 1826 is slightly misleading, and the building was actually a meter and a half longer than we’d initially thought. What is very exciting is that we’ve been able to find one side of the brick-built fireplace, as well as some evidence of the wooden partition between the main and ancillary rooms.

The remaining flagstones, with the brick wall of the fireplace in the centre of the image.

The remaining flagstones, with the brick wall of the fireplace in the centre of the image.

The spots of black that are in a line to the right of the flagstone, indicated the line of a burnt wooden partition between the main room with it's flagstone floor, and the ancillary room, which just had a packed earth floor.

The spots of black that are in a line to the right of the flagstone, indicated the line of a burnt wooden partition between the main room with it’s flagstone floor, and the ancillary room, which just had a packed earth floor.

We also found a number of really exciting finds! There were hundreds of pieces of pottery, dozens of iron nails, a handful of buttons (brass and bone ones), a 1690s silver 4d coin, and a copper alloy name badge belonging to a clergyman who knew – and on one occasion, saved Joe’s life!

This William and Mary Silver 4d dates from 1689-1694 and was issues as 'Maundy money' - how it came to be at Joe's cottage we've no idea!

This William and Mary Silver 4d dates from 1689-1694 and was issued as ‘Maundy money’ – how it came to be at Joe’s cottage we don’t know!

This name plate - we think it might be from a saddle, but we're not sure - belonged to 'Rev R. Clarke, Walwick - who, according to late accounts, battled through the snow in 1823 to save Joe, who was 'perishing of want'!

This name plate – we think it might be from a saddle, but we’re not sure – belonged to ‘Rev R. Clarke, Walwick – who, according to late accounts, battled through the snow in 1823 to save Joe, who was ‘perishing of want’!

We’re just in the final process of moving the numbered stones and bricks to the Museum, where they’ll be stored in advance of the cottage being built in several years’ time. In the intervening period we’ll be putting more information about these finds on here as we have research done on them, writing the excavation up for academic publication and having a shorter booklet about the cottage’s history and the excavation created for general interest. There will also be opportunities to be involved in further research and reconstruction of the cottage – so watch this space!

We’re really happy with the findings of the excavation and I’m very thankful to all those who’ve been involved – well done everyone!

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Filed under Joe the Quilter's Cottage, Remaking Beamish

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