Tag Archives: Fireplaces

Colour and detail arrives at the Chemist’s

As we hurtle towards our official opening in May, paint is going on the walls, the shop front is being sign-written, and the fireplace surround has been fitted.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sarah working on the sign-writing on the Chemist shop front

Sarah Jarman, our contract sign-writer has been working through the cold weather to bring the shop front alive. Clara and Sarah’s design for the fascia boards and wall panels are based upon shop fronts from the period. Victorian chemist shops were often very elaborate and full of advertising, intended to promote the various remedies that they sold. The windows of our Chemist’s will also be covered in raised lettering to indicate that alongside more conventional medicines, chemists and pharmacies sold photographic materials, surgical appliances and veterinary medicines.

Chemist shop front examples

Examples of  late Victorian and Edwardian Chemist shop fronts

Inside the walls of the chemist have been painted a dark red by Neil Harker, our contract painter and decorator. The colour was very popular during the mid-Victorian era following the Gothic revival, lead by architects such as Pugin.Shaun has also made a beautiful surround for the fireplace which incorporates a pair of 1840s shop corbels. The botanical carvings on the corbels compliment the painted glass Tudor roses on the shelving unit that will be fitted  and the floral motifs on the column, which has already been installed in the corner of the shop.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Shaun standing with the new fireplace surround in the Chemist

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under W. Smith's Chemist and Photographer's

Progress on W. Smith’s Chemist and Photographer’s

As we head towards the opening of the Chemist and Photographer’s in late Spring, and despite the snow, the Buildings Team have begun work on installing the period fixtures and fittings that will help to bring the new exhibit to life.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Shaun standing behind the shop counter in the reception area of the Photographer’s Studio.

In the Photographer’s, Shaun and his team have nearly finished fitting the impressive mahogany panels that will form the divide between the reception and studio. The shop counter has also been installed, which  has been made from the bottom sections of more of the mahogany panels (learn more about the Joinery Team’s work on the Chemist and Photographer’s here). The panelling will also continue along the walls of the corridor of the reception up to dado rail height, with specially reproduced wallpaper above.

wallpaper 1

The wallpaper that will be used in the Photographer’s Studio will be a reproduction of this 1907 sample.

The wallpaper is a copy of a pattern that was available to purchase from the Co-op in 1907. Clara found it in a catalogue that is in Beamish’s archives. It was chosen firstly because of its colour – ‘pea green’ was according to P. C. Duchochois’ 1891 book Lighting the Photographic Studio, a favourite with photographers due to its light reflecting qualities. It also has an Art Nouveau motif printed on it. By the early 1900s Art Nouveau had evolved from being an avant garde style, which originated in Paris to being one of the most popular and fashionable styles of the era. In contrast to the fussy foliage of William Morris-type patterns, its sinuous lines were considered to be extremely modern. This was something which a photographer, whose business relied upon fashion and up-to-date technology would probably have appreciated, and therefore we have decided to decorate the studio in the Art Nouveau style.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Paul installing the Art Nouveau fireplace in the Photographer’s studio.

With this in mind, the fireplace that Paul and his team are currently fitting in the studio with its exaggerated recessed-dome opening is in high Art Nouveau style. The wallpaper and fireplace, along with other details such as a beautiful restored gas chandelier and reclaimed early 20th century door furniture will help to make the space feel at the height of Edwardian fashion.

In contrast, the Chemist will be decorated in a much older style to reflect that it is a more established and traditional business. This means that although set in the 1910s, it will seem as if it has changed little since the 1880s, and in parts will appear to be even older, given that the building we are copying was original built during the mid-Georgian era. This means that the interior will include heavy, dark wooden shop fittings,which Shaun and his team have been restoring and resizing ready for their installation (look out for a further post with more details of this). Instead, of the stylish fireplace in the studio, the fireplace in the Chemists is a decoratively fussy, reclaimed hob-grate. When finished, the walls will be a dark ‘Pugin’ red that would have been very fashionable during the mid to late Victorian period, with reproduction ‘Anaglypta’ (or  raised textured) wallpaper on the ceiling, that will become increasingly stained by the gas lighting.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The mid-Victorian hob grate fireplace in the Chemist’s. 

Leave a comment

Filed under W. Smith's Chemist and Photographer's